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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the republican party for vice president and president nominated candidates who not only had zero foreign policy between them but no coherent policy whatsoever about what to do about the war and didn't mention it. while we have 66,000 americans in that war right now. we have serious things to make serious decisions about as a country. how do we turn down the nonsense enough to hope that our political process can be the means by which we make these grave and serious decisions? joining now is senator jeff merkley of oregon, chief sponsor of the amendment that passed calling on an accelerated withdrawal of u.s. forces from afghanistan. senator merkley, congratulations on the success of that amendment today. >> thank you very much, rachel. it's an incredible amount of things happening around the world today. >> yeah. i feel like this is one of those moments when i have very high hopes and very high wishes for what our political process will be capable of doing, and i have to say, seeing your amendment passed today in such a bipartisan fashion with so much republican support made me have some hope th
we sort of to set politics and issues aside. she bring as 21st century approach to foreign policy. one that is in step with president obama. she also has a great deal of passion for human rights and human dignity. what john kerry has passion for nobody is really sure. he is kind of a vanilla buy. she understands issues of poverty and pandemic and how though pray into national security and foreign policy. jon: on the other hand, senator mccain says, john kerry came within a whisker of being president of the united states, angela. senator mccain went on to say this, i would love to hear him make necessary case. i don't have anything in thinks background like the tragedy in gaziano that would make me carefully examine the situation. >> it is doing susan rice. if kerry is the nominee he would have smooth sailing through. in washington these are friends behind the scenes. if susan rice is nominee we'll have partisan politics. we have the liberal mainstream media already bashing republicans, some calling them racists and sexist in the fact they won't support susan rise because the fact
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
wants to return with a solid government. >> eliot: as we all learned foreign policy has domestic roots all over the place. we forget that sometimes. let's switch over to egypt, president morsi who came off the heels of international kudos and then came into bear tracks with his assembly and protest. is the content of this constitutional draft to the extent we've been able to pars it one that we in the united states look at favorably. does it balance civil liberties and the necessary role of islam in the new democracy in egypt? >> well, you know there is no way to call this a great constitution. it's a patchwork, and sort of a cobbling together various pieces of the old constitution with a few new ideas. if you want to be nervous there is plenty in there to be nervous. but i'm remaining hopeful for egypt. i'm impressed and it could be revised at any point. i'm impressed with how they've handled their revolution over the last year and a half. it could be so much worse. there could have been a muslim brotherhood who could have broken the peace treaty with israel or those who decided to go
and advisors are headed for the exits. who are the replacement and what impact on the foreign policy. doug has more for us in washington. >> foremost is who will replace hillary clinton as secretary of state? the white house signaled that un ambassador susan rice will be the choice . this week, the president voiced ut most confidence in her. >> susan rice is extraordinary . couldn't be prouder of a job done. >> also this week another republican senator expressed major doubts about rice not only about the bengazi terrorist attack but because of the africa section during the terrorist attack in the embassy in kenya when they pled for better security. susan collins teled the message to the administration about the secretary of state opening. >> i think john kerry would be an excellent appointment and easily confirmed by the colleagues. >> there are other key cabinet picks. secretary of the defense will have to contend with a destabilized middle east and rising threats from asia when big defense cuts are anticipated. former republican chuck ha gel of nebraska and ashton carter and michelle florino
a long background of dealing in foreign policy issues. but she's also somebody who hasn't been willing to answer some of the hard questions that many of my colleagues have had regarding the situation in benghazi. and i think that demonstrates questions about her judgment and how she would be -- how independent she would be as secretary of state. that's obviously something very important in a secretary of state. >> let's talk about the fiscal cliff. the president and other folks are hoping for a deal by christmas. is it doable? >> i hope so. i think there's at least in my view an opportunity here for us to do something that's really good for the country. but it has to be -- it's got to be entitlement reform included in anything that we ultimately act on. we believe that in order to solve the country's fiscal solvency issues into the future, you've got to deal with the issue of entitlement reform. that's something so far the president has been reluctant to put on the table. so far what we've gotten out of him is this proposal to raise taxes which we think would be harmful to the economy.
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
these policy issues. in your role now, what do you think is the most critical issue in foreign policy at this point? >> well, there are a series of them. i do think that one has to deal with the issue of continuing terrorism in certain places and as we've already raised, the nuclear proliferation issue. i also -- my personal belief is that the gap between the rich and the poor is something that is a national security issue and needs to be looked at. and what i'm doing here in turkey is being present atten infrastructure conference which does talk about the importance of providing infrastructure in developing countries because it's really a way to pursue giving the people what they need. i believe democracy has to deliver and infrastructure is one of the deliverables that really proves that we can help each over and eliminates what is a basic injustice as this gap between the rich and the poor. >> internal difficulties to overcome, as well. madeleine albright former u.s. secretary of state. thank you again for your time this morning. >>> now if you're just joining us, a reminder these
.s. troops on the ground. they wanted minimal arms to defend themselves and we outsourced our foreign policy to fundamentalist regimes and they supported the fundamentalists. there is one other issue. the nato air defense patriot batteries going to turkey to defend turkish air space and send a message to assad. that an inside baseball nato issue. and i wouldn't confuse that with giving arms to the syrian rebels. megyn: is there any way of establishing a safe haven any want the viewers to know syria seems so far away it seems like there is a bad guy running it and folks trying to exploit the situation. but the reports are some of these assad forces were going door to door, lining up entire families, shooting little kids in the head in front of their parent and shooting the parent in front of the children. lining them up one by one and watching them kill the families right in front of them. it's so gruesome and vial. is there anything we can do in terms of establishing a safe haven or something for people to get to? >> certainly there are de facto safe havens across the turkish and jordanian f
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)

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